How do you use your hands?

pencil_grip3

What’s the difference between you and your nearest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos? Well, not too much in terms of DNA percentages but quite a lot in terms of how the hands work. One key difference is that while chimps and bonobos have long fingers but short, weak, immobile thumbs, you have relatively short fingers but long, strong, mobile thumbs. The result is that, unlike your great ape relatives, you can you fully oppose your thumbs and the pads of each of your fingers, a pattern that enables you to grip or pinch objects with great precision. You employ it all the time in everyday life – for example, when buttoning your shirt, text messaging, or holding a pencil or picking up a coin.

Interestingly, healthy, young children are very dextrous – typically, toddlers can easily hold a round object such as a ball much bigger than their hand by elastically opening the hand very wide, thumb angled away from their other fingers, and then making contact with the top or side of the ball with a minimum amount of flexion or grip. It’s as if the child’s hand is sticking to the ball. How many adults are capable of this? Not many because most of us create too much muscle tension not only in the hands and arms but also in the rest of the body’s musculature, especially in the upper torso. Which is a great shame. But you can learn how to undo excess muscular tension by paying attention to how you use your hands in conjunction with what FM Alexander, the founder of the Alexander Technique, called the ‘primary control’ – maintaining the balance of your head, while your supportive back muscles lengthen and widen to provide stability not only for your head but also for your arms and hands.

By Seán Carey PhD

For more information on using the arms and hands read Seán Carey’s ‘Alexander Technique in Everyday Activity: Improve how you sit, stand, walk, work and run’

Available through Amazon for £18.99

Private one-to-one Alexander Technique sessions can be booked with Seán Carey on Thursdays afternoons with HITE Ltd, 10 Harley Street, London W1G 9PF. Tel: 020 7467 8461

How do you do the housework, in Goa?

Goa’s Patnem Beach

Can you lean forward from your hip joints, holding a brush, without compressing your double S-shaped spine, stiffening your legs and feet, or pulling your head down on to your neck? If you spend long hours sitting in a C-shaped slump in front of a screen, the answer is probably not. But look at this photo of two women sweeping Goa’s Patnem Beach just after sunrise. You will see that the woman in the blue sari is working much more efficiently than her colleague. By placing her open left hand on her lower back, the weight of that arm (around 4% of her body weight) can release through her pelvis, her legs and then into the ground. Her supported left arm also counterbalances the weight of her right arm which is holding the short broom made from coconut leaves. That, in turn, helps to keep her spine extended, supple and strong. Very clever. It also means that she will never experience chronic lower back pain!

By Seán Carey

For more information on how to bend and use yourself better read Seán Carey’s much-acclaimed book, ‘Alexander Technique in Everyday Activity: Improve how you sit, stand, walk, work and run’
Available through Amazon for £18.99

 

Can you stand on your toes?

Jessica Ennis-Hill

What do you do if you want to eat a juicy, but just-out-of reach, apple on a tree? You go up on to your toes, of course. In fact this movement on to the toes has likely played a very important part in the evolution of the uprightness and mobility of our species, including the unique ways humans walk, run and jump. Healthy, young children from all cultures are very good at going on to the toes – they just pop upwards – though interestingly many of us adults in Western-type societies perform the movement very badly. Why? Well, instead of maintaining alignment with your head balanced on top of your extended, double S-shaped spine, chances are that as you initiate the movement on to your toes your neck muscles will shorten and stiffen which, in turn, will result in your head compressing your spine and narrowing the back musculature. Simultaneously, you will sink into your legs and throw your body forward. Put simply, you have lost some of your internal length or, to use FM Alexander’s apt phrase, you have ‘shortened your stature’. Does it matter? It certainly does if you’re hungry and can’t stretch those extra centimetres to get that lovely apple! And shortening your stature not only involves stiffening from your head to your toes but also means that you are fixing your rib cage and barely breathing. Not good. But look at this picture of 2012 Olympic Heptathlon Champion Jessica Ennis-Hill standing on her toes in preparation for her run-up in the high jump. Jessica has brilliant alignment – head poised, spine extending, her back musculature widening, and her leg muscles stretching without strain. One last thing: although she is relatively small for a high jumper – she stands at 1.65 metres (5′ 5″) – Jessica has jumped 1.95 metres (6′ 5″) and was for many years joint British record holder for the outdoor event.

By Seán Carey

For more information on how going on to the toes should be performed read Seán Carey’s much-acclaimed book, ‘Alexander Technique in Everyday Activity: Improve how you sit, stand, walk, work and run’
Available through Amazon for £18.99

How do you stand?

Seán Carey explains how humans are the only animals that have the potential to stand fully upright – though how many of us actually do that?

Standing male posture

How much do you weigh? Eight, 10, 12 or 14 stone? Whatever your body weight you need good support from your musculoskeletal system to stand without strain. In fact, humans are the only species that can stand in a fully upright stance, with flexible ankles and fully extended knee and hip joints. With our joints stabilised by ligaments, body weight is then efficiently transmitted into the ground through the bones of a double S-shaped spine, pelvis, legs and the platforms of the feet, notably without much need to use the body’s large, powerful muscles, such as the gluteals, thighs and calves. Intriguingly, as anatomists have discovered, this alignment allows a healthy person to stand for hours, swaying slightly, using only seven per cent more energy than while lying on the ground.

But how many of us are capable of such efficiency in quiet standing? Very few, alas. The big problem for most of us is that we never, ever manage to come up to the potential of our full height – that is, the measurable distance between the crown of the head and the soles of the feet. Instead, we tend to droop or collapse, pulling the head down on to the neck, raising or collapsing the shoulders, pulling the lower back in and pushing the pelvis forward, as well as stiffening the muscles that operate the ankle, knee and hip joints. Given this pattern of mal-coordination, it’s hardly surprising that many of us suffer from a variety of musculoskeletal problems – chronic lower back pain, chronic neck pain, shoulder stiffness, achy legs or flat feet – as well as fatigue.

So is it possible to improve the efficiency of how you stand? Yes, although it’s fair to say that this takes more brainwork than physical work. For example, there’s no point trying to get some extra height by tightening the abdominal, gluteal or other muscles to ‘engage your core’ or by ‘tucking your tailbone under’. If you do either of these things you will only create additional tension – yet another ‘different form of badly’ to use philosopher and Alexander Technique enthusiast John Dewey’s pithy phrase – rather than a genuine release of your body’s musculature brought about by Alexander-style thinking (‘ordering’ or ‘directing’) that allows you to achieve your full height.

Seán Carey

For more information read Seán Carey’s Alexander Technique in Everyday Activity: Improve how you sit, stand, walk, work and run

Available through Amazon with free P&P

Pointing is key

Pointing is key to learning the Alexander Technique – Seán Carey PhD

‘See, even at the age of 98, I can still move my arms above my head,’ said Elisabeth Walker at the end of my one and only lesson with her at her Oxford home. She was responding to my question concerning whether FM Alexander, the founder of the Alexander Technique, had offered her and other students on his teacher training course much advice about extending or pointing the arms out to the sides, or above the head. ‘But he didn’t really make a big thing about it,’ she added. ‘Nevertheless, it’s very good for musicians and other people who get very tight in the armpits and need to get release.’

That conversation got me thinking more about gesture and pointing in particular. Humans are a very social species and a crucial building block in the development of that sociality is movement of the arms and hands, with or without accompanying speech. One gesture that seems to be especially important in our social development is pointing with an extended index finger. In fact, you would have started using that gesture around your first birthday, before you could talk, to get and direct the attention of adults and other children nearby to an object you wanted, such as food, a drink or a toy, or something that you found interesting, such as a hovering bumblebee, a slow-moving cat or a fast-moving aeroplane. In doing so, you discovered that movement can initiate and then maintain shared body-mind experiences. Simply put, people pay attention when you point, and you pay attention when they point.

It’s also evident that what comparative or developmental psychologists call purposeful or declarative-pointing with the index finger (which triggers extension or lengthening of the arm as illustrated in the photo below) is something for which we are peculiarly well adapted. It’s a behaviour found in all cultures. Some psychologists go further and claim that directed index finger-pointing is a uniquely human gesture as there is no reliable account of any of our great ape cousins living in the wild using it to communicate with other apes.

 

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Above We are peculiarly well-adapted to pointing with our index finger

The unique human ability to point not only your index finger but also your other fingers is certainly used to good effect in the Alexander Technique as it forms an important part of some specialised procedures, one of which Elisabeth Walker demonstrated for me in March 2013.

Another example is placing hands over the back of a chair. Alexander himself would ask a student to sit upright on a chair facing the back of a second chair equipped with a reasonably high back. Maintaining the balance of the head on the neck he slowly brought the student’s body forwards from the hip joints, carefully monitoring whether at any stage they compressed their double-S shaped spine. (If that happened Alexander would go back to the beginning of the sequence.) With the student leaning forward at an angle Alexander instructed them to take their time and then extend or point their fingers before taking hold of the top rail of the chair in front, using a gentle but firm beak-like grip with each hand, with the wrists pointing inwards towards each other and the elbows pointing outwards and slightly downwards. This opposition of fingers, wrists and elbows pointing in different directions creates a gentle forearm pull or stretch from the fingers-opposing-thumbs contact. This can be further amplified by directing the shoulders to release or point away from each other.

If you are not familiar with the procedure it might appear to be rather strange. In fact leaning forwards and then placing the hands on the back of a chair in this way generates a dynamic, elastic muscular release not only in the arms but also in the neck and shoulder girdle, and rib cage and pelvis. It also helps to fine tune your kinaesthetic sense. I have written about hands over the back of a chair in sitting and standing in some detail in my new book, Alexander Technique in Everyday Activity.

And I remember talking to Alexander’s niece, first-generation teacher Marjory Barlow, who I interviewed for Alexander Technique: the Ground Rules, about the problem many new students of the technique experience in letting their knees release forwards from the hip joints and away from each other as they move from standing on two feet to sitting in a more balanced way on their downward-pointing sitting bones. Marjory told me that whenever she encountered any difficulty she would not only ask the student to inhibit their immediate reaction to the stimulus to sit (typically by trying to actively place their bottom on the chair, pulling their knees together and pulling their head down on to their neck) but also ask them to think about and then consciously point their knees forward and away in the direction of suitable objects in her teaching room, such as a radiator or lamp, as with her hands she provided the experience of maintaining the integrity of the head, neck and back relationship. It was good advice.

A final thought. When you were younger you may have been told off by your parents for pointing at other people – “Don’t point, it’s rude!” is the customary form of words – but I hope I have said enough to convince your adult self that inhibiting and then pointing your fingers, elbows and knees and mentally other body parts, such as the shoulders, using the minimum amount of effort, is a good thing. In fact, it’s key to learning the Alexander Technique.

one thing into another

 

by Lucy Ash, artist – Alexander Technique pupil of Kamal Thapen

When I started to learn the Alexander Technique, I kept being reminded of this quote by Pablo Picasso. ‘It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.’ The point about the Alexander Technique is that it’s about unlearning everything we have learned – what feels familiar and comfortable is often bad for us – routines of behavior acquired subconsciously over the years by repeating the same action again and again are likely to be the wrong actions. By adopting a technique that is about thinking and then doing, we can create positive change. But like Picasso this unlearning, the business of doing of things differently, takes time and courage.

Applying a technique to our approach to life and the world around us can have very powerful results, but you have to take a leap of faith. As a painter it helps me to apply a technique to my work that is about self-awareness and understanding my body, that way I can get more from it. Painting is very physical, so my body has to work for me. How well I paint depends on my awareness, my thought process, my sensitivity and intuition. By becoming more sensitive I can make better decisions and be more agile. Making art, like the Alexander Technique, is a lot about how the conscious mind connects and directs the unconscious mind so the work has a resonance. I work with mixed media, usually oil paints, spray paint and ink. The process of using mixed media is very exciting – there’s the wonderful thing of how the oil paint and spray paint interact, it’s not entirely predictable and is a process of discovery where I may not know what I’m doing but find out by doing it and being brave. Molding something out of nothing with a mixture of mediums is a big part of what my work is about. Like the Alexander Technique it’s not about the end game it’s about the process. Not knowing where colliding particles will land, not controlling them and not worrying about the rules is part of my approach to creativity.

 Image 

‘one thing into another’ mixed media on linen, 168 cm x 213 cm, 5’ 6” X 7’

Bringing something experimental all together to create a sense of wholeness gives a feeling of completion and satisfaction and pleasure. The pieces of a painting make sense of the whole; in the same way that the pieces of our body make up a whole. The relationship between our neck and head affect to the rest of our body and every subsequent movement and action stem from this connection which, when it works, brings about a graceful and fluid movement. If part of your body is out of sync it affects your whole being, which not only has ramifications on how well we feel but also on how we relate to the world and how the world relates to us, plus it parallels the quality of work we produce as well as the process of painting.

Painters are a bit like magicians in how they transform one thing into another and something out of nothing as well as juggle the constantly changing relationships that have ramifications throughout the whole rest of the work. One mark leads to another; a small mark can instigate big change, which is the exciting part of creating.  So why is change, which is so inevitable, so very unwelcome? A changing world and personal change are incredibly scary even when the status quo isn’t that great. What we know is what we like because it feels familiar and safe and is where we would like to stay if we could, but we can’t. A technique such as Alexander equips us with the tools we need to venture out from the known present into the unknown future. It’s about the fundamental nature of being, integrating and grounding the whole person; it allows bad habits to be unlearned, great works of art to be painted, and needs to be embraced.

 Image

‘one thing into another’, Winchester Cathedral, 2013, part of Creative Collisions 10 days Winchester

Alexander Technique ‘Proof of Age’ Elixir

by Emily Pacey, freelance design and architecture journalist  – Alexander Technique pupil of Kamal Thapen

The other day when purchasing a bottle of supermarket plonk I was asked for proof of age. Being nigh on 38 years old, this came as a bit of a surprise. In this instance, proof of age turned out to be nothing more official than my cracked smile and breathless thank yous for making my day, half-way though which I was waved on with no further questions. I went home glowing happily while also aghast at the derangement of the sales assistant. Were it not for my dodgy knees, I believe I would have skipped. You see, a few years ago I quietly buried any last hopes of ever being ID’d again, saying to myself, ‘well old gal, thosedays are behind you – let’s just get on with nurturing a dowager’s hump and eroding the rest of your knee cartilage,’ which I duly did.

Proof of AgeHad the incident been a one-off I would have treated it as a freak event and carried on as usual, but in the same week I was ID’d a further three times by three different sales assistants in three different brands of supermarket. By the way, I am not an alcoholic – I’m just addicted to being mistaken for someone who has to prove that they are over 25.

Bemused and delighted, I cast around for an explanation – what had changed in the past couple of weeks to knock more than a decade off my supermarket age? The answer: I had just broken the eight session mark in a course of Alexander Technique, my dowager’s hump was less humpy and my dodgy knee had got its spring back after we discovered that I have spent most of my life locking my knees and pressing them back like a sergeant major.

More people need to know about the cosmetic benefits of Alexander Technique – it is definitely not shouting enough about its youth-giving, elixir-like qualities. However, you can go too far – I am starting to fear taking many more lessons in case next time I’m in Sainsbury’s, a concerned sales assistant puts out a tannoy call  for my mummy (whose idea it was for me to take Alexander lessons – thanks mum).

Our grateful thanks to Emily for sharing her experiences. For further information or to book a session with Kamal, see  www.hiteltd.co.uk or contact kamal@hiteltd.co.uk

Image thanks to VALIDATE UK   www.validateuk.co.uk info@validateuk.co.uk 01434 634996

Alexander Technique in the Saddle – Origins

FM  Alexander on Horse

FM Alexander on Horse

Saddle work has a long history in the Alexander Technique. In 1955, a 4-year- old girl with spina bifida started having lessons with FM Alexander. She didn’t have the use of her legs and was unable to sit up. But Alexander was confident that if he could get the girl to stand, he would be able to help her walk.

Alas, Alexander died soon after their meeting. But his assistant teachers had a bright idea. To help the youngster gain more balance, they worked with her while she sat on a toy donkey. It was fun for the girl and easier for the teachers. She was able to sit comfortably on her sitting bones and the teachers could help her overall co-ordination and get release on her legs.

As she grew, the donkey was replaced by a wooden trestle with a horse’s saddle. By the time she was 13, the Technique had helped her build up enough upper body support to start to walk with callipers and crutches. This led the way forward to leading an independent life, going to university, driving and working.

In time, saddle work expanded and was also used to work with other Alexander students. It is an enormously helpful way to get undoing and lengthening in the legs. Our legs and hip joints often tend to get very tight and tense, particularly with the amount of sitting in modern life. Saddle work can also help with lower back pain, particularly in the lumbar and sacro-iliac areas.

In fact, sitting in a saddle is often feels easier than sitting in a chair, as the balance is directly on the sitting bones. Also, excessive tensions in the legs and the hips can release, often including those we are unaware of. Often we are not even aware we are holding tensions unnecessarily. The Alexander Technique helps us get to the tensions even held below the radar.

For horse riders, practising on a wooden horse with hands on guidance by an Alexander teacher helps to get a sense of a good seat, without needing to grip with the legs, buttocks or back. And a wooden horse won’t respond to any riding signals so is a good opportunity for experimentation!

FM Alexander himself was a keen horseman, as was his assistant Walter Carrington. Today horse riding and Alexander Technique have close connections. See Back-in-the-saddle-thoughts-on-recovery-riding-and-the-alexander-technique written by one of our students, a rider.

The next HITE ‘Improve your Seat’ workshop is from 1:30 – 4:30pm on Saturday 6th October at 10 Harley Street, London W1G 9PF. Designed especially for riders, you will gain insights and experiences through the application of the Alexander Technique on how you can find a comfortable posture and even seat on the saddle and discover a more harmonious connection with your horse. For further information and to book your place click on Improve Your Seat – Riding and Alexander Technique Workshop today.

Back in the Saddle; thoughts on recovery, riding and the Alexander Technique

by Leonie (Beadie) Charlton – Alexander Technique pupil of Claire Rennie & Erica Donnison

Last year felt like the longest of my life.  January through to August, when I finally had spinal surgery, felt like an interminable blur of pain.  Progressively debilitating back pain had forced me to stop my beloved work as an Equine Podiatrist, stop riding, walking, swimming, cycling, housework, even cooking was nigh on impossible.  In terms of my ability to helpfully participate in my life, with three young children and all that entails, I felt next to useless.  As I became increasingly out of kilter physically, so too did my mental and emotional balance tip dangerously.  It was a frightening time looking into a forbidding sea-swell of unknowns, and most starkly terrifying of all to me was the thought of no longer being able to enjoy my longest and truest passion, riding.

I had two herniated discs, one of which had oozed into my spinal canal and was crushing the sciatic nerve, giving me extreme nerve pain down my right leg and buttock.  The pain forced me into my own body in a whole new way; anyone who has experienced the final stages of childbirth will know the sense of total absorption that comes with intense pain. I see now that the whole experience was like a birth for me; I am brimful with gratitude with where I am now, how my relationship to my back, to my self, to my riding, to my life has changed.

It took something pretty serious for me to change habits that were damaging me, yet now the philosophical emotional and practical applications of the Alexander Technique that I have been able to integrate has brought me so many gifts.  I wouldn’t change anything.  It is an ongoing process of unlearning and learning, of doing and non doing; as a friend (in her mid seventies, who still rides extensively and beautifully) said recently, ‘if you cant enjoy the process you haven’t got a lot going for you!’.

I went into hospital with my vast array of painkillers, a book of Mary Oliver’s poetry and several on the Alexander Technique.  I spent the eight weeks following surgery learning a whole new level of awareness of my body, I was following FM Alexander’s directions as much as I could, by reading, by listening to CDs and from the few Alexander Technique lessons I had had previously.  I had no choice but to move very, very slowly; I had to think carefully about every movement I made and took the time to pause and consider before I did anything.  It was in many ways the perfect opportunity to change old habits that had clearly been causing me harm, mainly by doing things with a ‘pushing through/ driving/ no matter if it hurts’ mentality.  Pain had become normal for me over the years, something to be stoically ignored, almost part of my identity.  Well thankfully my body just wasn’t going to put up with that indefinitely.

Eight weeks after surgery I took my horses along to a riding clinic.  I was unsure and pretty anxious on several levels; I didn’t know how the surgery may have affected my riding, the horses had had a long time off so I had no idea how they would be, and I also had a big question around whether I may have lost my nerve.  The minute I was in the saddle I could feel myself different; I was almost totally focusing on my self and my own body, constantly checking in and asking if I was holding tension anywhere, and letting go if I found any.

My horse loved it, after 9 months with no work he gave me the most beautiful trot work I had ever had on him.  Forward, rhythmically and working through his back.  I was overjoyed, I can remember very clearly thinking ‘I don’t want this to end, ever..’. I felt like we were floating together.  I was with my horse, and he was able to flow forwards because my body was free of restrictions.  I could not have had more positive feedback from him.  I was in heaven.

At the end of the session my riding teacher said ‘wow, that’s the best I’ve ever seen you ride.  Eight months off has been great for you.  What’s happened?  What have you changed what have you been doing?’  I paused for a moment before answering with certainty ‘I’ve been really focusing on the Alexander Technique… and I have been letting go’.  Horses are such honest mirrors for us, the minute we do something differently they change.  How we use our bodies makes all the difference to how they can use theirs, and they will show us in an instant the difference between ‘use’ and ‘abuse’.

It takes a great deal of attention and practice to really change habitual patterns of tension, of posture, even of thought.  That is where the AT is so incredibly powerful; the technique is a fantastic tool for helping us become really body aware, to be able to turn off all the muscles we don’t need in a given moment, to turn on just the ones required, and then to turn them off again the minute they are no longer needed.  To the horse, a creature who lives so wholly in the present, that makes complete and utter sense. It is meaningful conversation.  With the help of the AT I am quicker to notice when and where I am holding and can use the directions to help release the blocks.

My riding teacher often says ‘hold nothing’; we give an aid and then immediately we go back to neutral with our hands and legs, if we hold on, hang on or squeeze on anywhere in our body we effectively set up resistance in the horse’s body, and all they can do to stay safe from our mixed messages and clumsiness and heaviness is to switch their own lightness off.  To ride well, really well, it involves incredible self awareness, and is a lifetime’s work, it is a constant meditation, it is an art, and I feel happy and honoured to be somewhere along the humble beginnings of this path.

Paying close attention to what is happening with our own bodies is a fascinating and health giving process, and when you are further rewarded for that close attention by your horse moving more fluidly and happily beneath you, it is massively motivating.  I love these words by the poet Roger Housden, ‘It is our attention that honours and gives value to living things…  When I pay attention, something in me wakes up, and that something is much closer to who I am than the driven or drifting self I usually take myself to be.  I am straightened somehow, made truer, brought to a deeper life’.  To me that resonates beautifully with the practice of the Alexander Technique.

*****

it’s the quality of the spine that influences the horse’. Perry Wood

our good posture is the only thing we have over the horse’.  Eric Herberman

The shoulder in is like herbal tea. It is a potion with medicinal qualities. When you ride it, let it go slow and let it steep.  Let it brew half the value of tea like this is in the careful meditation during its preparation’.  Anon 17th century

Sit well, do nothing, and let the horse do’.  Colonel Mario de Mendoza

*****

Our grateful thanks to Leonie for sharing her experiences.  The next HITE ‘Improve your Seat’ workshop is from 1:30 – 4:30pm on Saturday 6th October at 10 Harley Street, London W1G 9PF. Designed especially for riders, you will gain insights and experiences through the application of the Alexander Technique on how you can find a comfortable posture and even seat on the saddle and discover a more harmonious connection with your horse.  For further information and to book your place click on HITE Improve Your Seat Riding and Alexander Technique Workshops today.

Olympics Team GB Equestrian Gold, Silver & the Alexander Technique

Fantastic to see the Olympic Gold medal achieved by the GB Showjumping team – Nick Skelton, Ben Maher, Scott Brash and Peter Charles – following the nail biting jump off against the Netherlands.  Fortunately, unlike far too numerous to list, England football penalty shoot outs, the Team GB Showjumping team won!  I remembered watching Nick Skelton in the 1980s competing and so it was especially great to see him achieve Gold today.  And that on top of the Silver medal achieved by the GB Eventing team last week involving William Fox-Pitt, Nicola Wilson, Zara Phillips Mary King and Tina Cook.  Well done Equestrian Team GB!!!

All my life I have been fascinated by the beauty, the unity, the strength and grace of horse and rider.

Poise of the rider is one of the fundamental pillars of good horsemanship.  Recently, I have been having a course of horse riding lessons with a new instructor.  She was interested to learn that I was an Alexander Technique teacher and asked me lots of questions about it.  Because it is a technique embraced by many riders she had initially thought that it was developed within and solely for the equestrian field.  She was surprised to hear that FM Alexander, the founder of the Alexander Technique was an actor who was trying to resolve his breathing and vocal problems.

But she re-iterated its importance to riders and by the end of the lesson said that I had been far easier to teach and was picking up riding skills and building a good relationship and partnership with the horse far quicker than most riders.  ‘Every rider should have Alexander Technique lessons’ she exclaimed.  ‘They’d be far easier to teach’!

The whole issue of finding one’s seat in a poised, fluid and dynamic way which gives a sense of expansiveness through the rider to the horse through all transitions is eased by learning the Alexander Technique alongside taking riding lessons.  But why is that?

When we sit on a horse we bring with us all the habitual thought and postural patterns that we have accumulated thus far.  That includes how we slump at a desk with eyes focused on a computer screen, or collapse into an armchair.  How we hold the reins will be conditioned by how we habitually hold our knife and fork, our toothbrush or a pen!  These patterns of tension become a way of being and we take them into riding a horse.

As riders, we may know and have been told countless times that good posture is important in horse riding.  Consequently, we may put in huge efforts to sit up straight, look out and keep the heels down.  But it isn’t natural to have to make such an effort, it is hard to maintain it, it doesn’t bring the best out of the horse and to top it all, it can be painful.  Believe it or not, natural poise and good posture should be and feel effortless, like you see in a baby sitting with its head beautifully balanced on top of its spine, with a sense of calm and aliveness in its eyes.

If you find that you struggle to sit up straight without a lot of effort it is not that you are lazy and not working hard enough, or are not strong enough and need to do more exercises.  It is just that you have, over the years, got into habits which have led to your postural mechanisms getting out of kilter such that the wrong muscles are doing the wrong jobs.  Jobs for which they are not best suited.  You might be making huge muscular efforts but the results aren’t great and there is a lot of unnecessary stress and strain going on.

With the help of an Alexander Technique teacher you can begin to breathe a sigh of relief.  You will gradually learn how to consciously prevent unnecessary tensions, stress and strain and how to encourage your natural poise to come through again.  Your poise has not been extinguished, it is in you as your birthright as a human being and can, be allowed to blossom again.

You will learn a process of thinking, moving and being which will not only enhance all the activities in your life, but crucially as a rider, will enable you to ‘find your seat’ and explore new depths of beauty and unity in riding.

The next HITE ‘Improve your Seat’ workshop is from 1:30 – 4:30pm on Saturday 6th October at 10 Harley Street, London W1G 9PF.  Designed especially for riders, you will gain insights and experiences through the application of the Alexander Technique on how you can find a comfortable posture and even seat on the saddle and discover a more harmonious connection with your horse.

For further information and to book your place click on HITE Improve Your Seat Riding and Alexander Technique Workshops today.